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Early coins from 1700, 1800

12/02/2018

by Admin


During the 1700’s and 1800’s, gold coins and silver coins became very popular in nearly all parts of the world as trading grew. Coins were used as “commodity money”. This means that the value of a coin was dependent on the amount of silver or gold it contained. Below is a list of brief descriptions of various gold coins and silver coins that were used in the 1700’s and 1800’s.

UNITED STATES GOLD COINS AND SILVER COINS

GOLD DOLLARS

The United States Gold Dollar is also known as the Liberty Head Gold Dollar and was introduced in 1849. Throughout its existence, it has featured several different design changes that are divided into Type one, Type two, and Type three Gold Dollars.

The Type One Liberty Head Gold Dollar has the image of Lady Liberty wearing a coronet. It was designed by James B. Longacre and was minted between 1849 and 1854. Featured on the Type Two Liberty Gold Dollar coin is a representation of Lady Liberty wearing a Native American feathered headdress. The Type Three Liberty Head Gold Dollar features Lady Liberty’s image that is similar to the one that appears on the type two version, but the image is larger.

QUARTER EAGLES

This coin was produced by the United States Mint between 1796 and 1929. It features the same Lady Liberty image that’s found on the Gold Dollar coins, but the Quarter Eagle also had its own unique design changes. The first Quarter Eagle was produced in 1796 and laid claim to the Turban Head design.

DOUBLE EAGLES

The Double Gold Eagle coins were first minted in 1849. The Double Eagle played host to 2 different designs. Beginning in 1849, the Twenty Dollar Liberty Head Double Eagle was made with Lady Liberty’s image facing towards the left on one side and the Great Seal of the U.S. was featured on the second coin.

CONTINENTAL DOLLARS

Continental Dollars were issued in the late eighteenth century and were minted from silver, brass, or pewter. They all bear the date 1776. They don’t have a face-value, but they’re thought of as Dollar coins by coin collectors.

SILVER DOLLAR 1794 TO 1803

There are two main types of Silver Dollar coins from this era, known as Draped Bust and Flowing Hair. The Draped Bust coins had two different designs on their back side, either a heraldic eagle or small eagle. They were struck from hand engraved dyes and as a result, there are many minor varieties.

1804 SILVER DOLLAR

The 1804 Silver Dollar was actually minted in 1834 as a gift to the Sultan of Muscat and the King of Siam. He later gave some of the 1804 Silver Dollars to his lover, Anna Leonowens, as seen in the story of the King of Siam and Anna and the movie The King and I.

1895 MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR PROOF

With approximately eighty coins only known to exist, the 1895 Morgan Silver Dollar Proof coins are quite rare. No regular Morgan Dollars from 1895 are known. There are a lot of theories about what may have happened to the twelve thousand 1895 Morgan Silver Dollar Proof coins that the United States Mint records claim were minted.

BRITISH GOLD COINS AND SILVER COINS

GUINEA

The Guinea was first introduced in 1663 and remained the main gold coin in Britain until 1816. Its name was derived from the British colony of Guinea, which had rich gold reserves that were imported into Britain. Most of the Guinea gold coins bear a small elephant in their design, to commemorate their African origins.

THE BRITISH POUND

In June 1816, during King George III`s reign, the British Parliament decided to abandon silver as the basis of its monetary system in favor of the gold standard. As a result in 1817, the Gold Guinea was replaced with the British Pound. The reverse side of the Gold Pound bore the image of Saint George slaying a dragon and was designed by Benedetto Pistrucci. The minting of the British Pound continued under the successors of George III and became the reference currency for investment and international trade, thanks to its high demand.

SOVEREIGN

The Sovereign was first created in 1489. After a break of more than two hundred years (1604 to 1816), this gold coin was given a new lease of life under the reign of George III. Large numbers of Sovereigns were produced using the steam-driven minting machines of Matthew Boulton.

THREEPENNY BIT

These tiny silver coins, also known as Threepence, Thrup’ny and Thruppence, were minted every year of the reign of Queen Victoria except 1852, 1847 and 1848. The Threepenny Bit featured Queen Victoria’s bust on one side. The young profile was used from 1838–1886, then the Jubilee bust was used between 1887 and 1893 and then an elderly veiled-bust was used until 1901. The other side of the Threepenny Bit depicted a crown and a large number 3, the year it was issued, all within one wreath. In 1887, the crown changed to match the mourning crown of the Queen.

FOURPENNY BIT

These silver coins were also known as Fourpence, Joey, and Groat. The Fourpenny Bit was minted for circulation in Britain between 1838 and 1855. The Fourpenny Bit featured a young bust of Queen Victoria on one side, the Britannia with the date-below on the other side, and four pence around its edge.

SIXPENCE

These silver coins were also known as a Tanner and a Half Shilling. Between 1838 and 1887 the Sixpence featured Queen Victoria’s young profile with her hair in a bun. The other side of the Sixpence coin had six pence written within a wreath, the date below, and a crown above. In 1887, a Jubilee version of the Sixpence was issued that had a shield on the reverse and a robed and crowned much older bust on its other side.

SHILLING

These silver coins were also known as were also known as a Bob and they were minted every year of the reign of Queen Victoria, except for 1847. Three busts were used; a young bust between 1838 and 1887, a Jubilee bust between 1887 and 1892, and an elderly veiled-bust between 1893 and 1901. On the reverse of the Shilling that was minted between 1838 and 1887 was “One Shilling” that was encircled by a wreath, the date below and a crown above. On the 1887 Jubilee version, its reverse featured the Royal Arms shield and a crown that were both encircled by the date below and a garter. The 1893 Shilling featured three shields (Ireland, England, Scotland) with a garter, the date below, and “One Shilling” around its edge.

SPANISH GOLD COINS AND SILVER COINS

MARAVEDIS

For over eight hundred years, the Maravedis was Spain’s standard gold coin. It’s value and weight dramatically changed according to who ruled Spain at the time. Over time, the Maravedis became available in copper and silver varieties, particularly in Spanish colonies. The faces of several kings, including Philip V, Philip IV, Philip III, Ferdinand VII, Ferdinand VI, Joseph Bonaparte, Charles III and Charles IV were etched into the Maravedis. Queen Isabel II, made it onto the Maravedis from 1843 to 1868, when she was dethroned.

REALES

In the 1300s, King Pedro 1 of Castile introduced the Reales, which is a silver coin that means “royal.” The Reales remained in circulation until the Escudo was introduced in 1864. The weight and value of Reales changed over time, according to the ruler at the time.

ESCUDOS

Escudos are divided into silver and gold categories. The original Gold Escudo was introduced in 1566 was minted in one-half, one, two, four, and eight escudos. It was the official currency of Spain from 1864 to 1869. Most Escudos were minted in either Seville or Madrid. An Escudo coin from Seville is marked with an S and one from Madrid will have an M.

DOUBLOONS

Special two piece Escudos were known as the Doubloon, which means “double” in Spanish. They were manufactured in Nueva Granada, Spain, Mexico, and Peru. The Doubloon featured the a coat of arms or cross that was known as Hapsburg Shield on one side and the busts of Isabel or Ferdinand on the other. The Doubloon was last minted in 1849.

PESETA

In 1869, the Escudo was replaced by the Peseta when Spain joined the Latin Monetary Union. The Peseta, meaning “fraction,” or “piece”, came in denominations of one, two, and five pesetas; and one, two, five, ten, and fifty céntimos.

CANADIAN GOLD COINS AND SILVER COINS

1862 BRITISH COLUMBIA DOLLAR GOLD COINS

The 1862 British Columbia Five-Dollar and the 1862 British Columbia Ten- Dollar Gold Coins were proposed during the Gold Rush to cope with an extreme shortage of currency. Although test strikes were made in silver and some ornamental strikes in gold were made from the dies, these were never officially recognized.

1865–1888 NEWFOUNDLAND TWO-DOLLAR GOLD COIN

A handsome, Victoria headed Two-Dollar Gold Coin was issued in Newfoundland. This Newfoundland Two-Dollar Gold Coin made history as the only colony of Britain with its own gold coin issue. Just under one hundred thousand dollars’ worth of coins were issued and as a result, they’re hardly rare.

To purchase collectible coins, contact Capital Gold Group at 1(800)510-9594 today!